Longevity Exercise Physiology Drummoyne,EdgecliffMarrickville,Bella VistaRandwickLindfield and Balmain offer home visits in the surrounding suburbs. Exercise Physiologist Courtney shares with us a recent rewarding experience with one of her home visit clients.

 

Exercise at 89 years-it’s never too late!

 

Alison* is 89 years old and was referred to Longevity by her GP because she was experiencing significant low back and leg pain, ankle swelling and also has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She hadn’t been doing her normal amount of activity due to Covid-19 and was feeling quite down about the amount of pain she was experiencing. The exact cause of Alison’s pain was not completely understood, but it was likely a result of a change in routine and a flare up in her arthritis.

 

It was difficult for Alison to attend the gym, so she started with 2 home visit sessions per week and she was introduced to exercises that aimed to gradually increase her mobility, strength, walking capacity and confidence.

It is normal to feel anxious about starting to exercise if you have RA. Often people are fearful of causing damage to the joints or the presence of pain. However! As Exercise Physiologists we know that people with RA can participate in regular, appropriate exercise without causing joint damage or worsening of symptoms. In fact, a combination of aerobic, strength and mobility training are crucial for living a normal life with RA.

The 5 Times Sit to Stand Test was one measure used to access Alison’s progress. In June it took Alison 44 secs to sit up and down from her chair 5 times and by August, Alison was completing the test in less than 22 secs! In less than a month Alison has shown a huge improvement in lower limb strength and confidence in her ability to do daily tasks. Alison has also noticed how much her mood and ability to cope with pain improves straight after she exercises.

A touch on Rheumatoid Arthritis…

 

RA occurs when the immune system attacks the lining of the joints, called the synovium. Synovium is the tissue lining around a joint that produces a fluid to help the joint move smoothly. Inflamed synovium gets thicker and makes the joint area feel painful and tender, swollen or stiff and moving the joint can be difficult. RA commonly affects the hands, knees or ankles, and usually the same joint on both sides of the body.

 

It is normal to feel anxious about starting to exercise if you have RA. Often people are fearful of causing damage to the joints or the presence of pain. However! As Exercise Physiologists we know that people with RA can participate in regular, appropriate exercise without causing joint damage or worsening of symptoms. In fact, a combination of aerobic, strength and mobility training are crucial for living a normal life with RA.

 

Strength training also improves the strength of your bones and helps prevent a condition called osteoporosis, which is more common with ongoing steroid medications used to treat RA.

 

 

To develop an exercise routine appropriate for you and your situation, it is important to speak with an Exercise Physiologist.

Contact Longevity today and book in your free strategy session to see how we can help! 1300 964 002

 

* Name changed for privacy reasons

 

Written by Courtney Maher